“Web Design & Construction for Libraries” (Beginners) Web-based Course

via LIB_REF

Register to work -at-your-own-pace anytime with a teacher to respond and support your work.

(beginners) Web Design & Construction for Libraries Part 1: XHTML and CSS
Syllabus at http://kovacs.com/wdpart1.html Self-paced registration http://kovacs.com/register.html

This hands-on course focuses on the basics of Web site planning and design and content development. The course will also examine Web standards, usability, and accessibility. XHTML and CSS (external) will be introduced.  The course begins with XHTML/HTML basics tutorials and a practice activity to make sure everyone has the basic skills. Students will plan and design a representative site during the course.

Designing Web Sites for Academic Libraries, Part 1. is a primarily asynchronous seminar, allowing participants to work through course material at times convenient to them. The instructor will provide feedback to all completed work via email. Participants may also choose to schedule online chat time with the teacher, as they feel necessary.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

1. Plan and design a Web site for Usability and simple Accessibility for selected users/groups.
2. Understand and apply Web Standards
3. Develop basic Web site contents for selected users/groups.
4. Use DreamWeaver (MX2004 or higher preferred) *OR* a text editor to create usable, accessible, and interesting Web pages. You may use FrontPage or other HTML editor if you already know what you are doing with it.

Participants will end the session with a completed Web site plan, design, and a main Web page that illustrates how the design will be implemented and will allow for minimal usability and accessibility testing. These pages will also be validated XHTML with external cascading style sheets.

On completion of the course each registrant will receive a certificate of completion for 30 Continuing Education Contact Hours*. *Note that some organizations calculate Web-based CE hours on 2 or 3-1 ratio – so for example this course may be evaluated as 15 or 10 ‘official’ CE hours depending on the organization.

Tuition $225

(intermediate) Web Design & Construction for Libraries Part 2: CSS and Javascript
will begin where Web Design & Construction for Libraries Part 1: XHTML and CSS (beginners) ends. Web Design & Construction for Libraries Part 3: Building Library 2.0 (advanced) is under development.
Syllabus at http://kovacs.com/wdpart2.html Self-paced registration http://kovacs.com/register.html Tuition $225

Conflict in the Peaceful Library has a new start time

The next WebJunction webinar, Conflict in the Peaceful Library, has a new start time. The one-hour webinar will now be held on September 16, 9 AM Pacific/12 PM Eastern. We apologize greatly for any inconvenience this may cause you, but the schedule change was unavoidable.

You do not need to re-register or do anything special to accommodate the time change.

If you are not able to make it to the live webinar, it will be recorded and made available on the WebJunction website here: http://www.webjunction.org/community-webinars/articles/content/9004175

We apologize for the inconvenience the schedule change causes, but unfortunately, it was unavoidable.

Here is a list of other upcoming WebJunction Webinars (Times listed inCentral Time Zone):

Conflict in a Peaceful Library (UPDATE: Start time has changed to 11 AM Central)
When: Tuesday September 16th, 2008 – 11:00 AM
UPDATE: The start time has changed for this webinar! This webinar will now begin at 11 AM Central.

Conflict happens! Many of us try to avoid it, some fight with it, some seem to enjoy it and still others seem to handle it with tact and skill. What’s the secret to effectively handling situations of conflict? How can we de-emotionalize ourselves to the situations so that we don’t get caught up in them?

Join Andrew Sanderbeck as he explores our dealings with others in the library by defining the conflict situation and using one of three approaches to successfully handle or resolve it. If you don’t like to be yelled at by other people, you’ll really enjoy this fun and interactive webinar.

Public computers and 2.0 Tools (MaintainIT Cookbook Webinar)
When: Wednesday September 17th, 2008 – 01:00 PM

Grab a comfy chair and participate in a 30-minute discussion where contributors to the Cookbooks share their insights, their secrets, and what you can do to get started with projects like theirs. Join Robin Hastings from the Missouri River Regional Library as she talks about the steps they have taken to foster a 2.0 friendly environment at their library, for both staff and library users. By setting up a flexible computing environment and creating innovative learning opportunities, this creative professional has helped her community make the most of collaborative technologies. Take 30 minutes out of your day to learn from the experiences of others and get something started.

Teaching The Redesigned (New) Naturalization Test
When: Thursday September 25th, 2008 – 01:00 PM

This webinar will provide an overview of the redesigned (new) naturalization test, which will replace the current test on October 1, 2008. Join Dr. Michael Jones, Senior Advisor Immigrant Education, and Carlos Muñoz-Acevedo, Outreach Specialist, of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, as they cover the necessary skills and instructional methods needed by those who are preparing students to take the redesigned (new) naturalization test.

Visual Design: Theory & Best Practices for Library Websites
When: Tuesday October 7th, 2008 – 01:00 PM

Today, our users/patrons expect visually engaging and informative websites. The fonts, images, colors and styles of your web pages should support your mission, content, publicity and service goals. Join presenter Michael Leach as he highlights both theory and best practices that support a visually engaging website—what fonts should you choose; which styles work best for content presentation; what types of images and graphics convey information better; and how do colors influence users’ perceptions and use of a website.

Latinos and Public Library Perceptions
When: Tuesday October 14th, 2008 – 12:00 PM

WebJunction, in partnership with the Tomás Rivera Policy Institute, recently publised a research report detailing the results of a six-state telephone survey of over 2,860 adult Latinos completed in early 2008. Learn about the findings and implications of the study from WebJunction’s Laura Staley and researchers from TRPI.

Refugees 101
When: Thursday October 23rd, 2008 – 01:00 PM

In 1975 the United States began accepting large numbers of refugees in response to the Fall of Saigon. Over the next 33 years approximately 2.6 million refugees have been resettled in this country, and many of these individuals are now using our libraries. Join Valerie Wonder, Immigrant & Refugee Programs Manager at Seattle Public Library (WA) and Homa Naficy Manager of Multicultural Education and Outreach Services at Hartford Public Library (CT) as they provide an overview of refugee resettlement in the United States including information on recent refugee populations. She will also highlight some successful approaches to serving refugees in public libraries. Before working for SPL, Valerie was the Community Programs Manager for the International Rescue Committee’s Seattle office where she specialized in refugee services.

Branding Libraries and Their Services
When: Friday November 7th, 2008 – 01:00 PM

We are surrounded by brands in our world—visual representations of a manufactured good or some service that allows a customer/user/patron to quickly identify the product/service. If someone says, “Golden arches,” you immediately think of a certain fast food restaurant. Any business or service can brand itself, for marketing and publicity purposes. But what is a brand? How are they created? What benefits do brands offer? What are the challenges facing a branding project? Can libraries effectively brand themselves and their services? If so, how? Join Michael Leach as he answers these and other questions, while providing a solid framework and background on what brands are and how they work.

24/7 Librarianship: Reaching Patrons With Digital Tutorials
When: Wednesday November 12th, 2008 – 01:00 PM

Join guest speaker Marcia Dority Baker of Schmid Law Library,University of Nebraska College of Law as she explains how libraries can use digital tutorials to reach customers around the clock. She will discuss how digital tutorials can support learning and instruction as well as provide access to information and educational resources to customers when the doors of the library are closed.

We will explore: what is a digital tutorial, how libraries can use digital tutorials, help brain-storm ideas on how all types of libraries could be creative with limited budget and staff resources, and include tips on free video software librarians could use to get started.

Bite-size Digital History
When: Wednesday December 3rd, 2008 – 10:00 AM

Join guest presenter Katie Artzner of the Foundation Center for a half-hour overview of ideas for creating local digital history documentaries in short, bite-size form using Microsoft PhotoStory 3. We will explore: what makes a good local history digital history documentary, a few nuts and bolts of using Microsoft Photostory 3, and your ideas for what your library could do with them.

via BlogJunction

2 ACRL e-Learning Events

via cjc-l

Registration is now open for the following e-Learning events.  Reserve your seat today for these exciting programs!
 
Designing Web Sites for Academic Libraries, Part 2
September 1 – 27, 2008
 
This four-week course builds on the work completed in “Designing Web Sites for Academic Libraries, Part 1.” Learn about advanced CSS design, accessible menus, and re-Javascript. The course will also review multimedia (FLASH, Quicktime etc.), Web-accessible database applications (PHP, MYSQL, ASP etc.), and content management software options.
 
Keys to Innovation
September 9, 2008
11 a.m. Pacific | 12:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 p.m. Eastern
 
Discover new ways to look at innovation by participating in this interactive, live Webcast. Learn the differences between innovation and creativity. Be part of a discussion on the impact of an organization’s age on its innovation tendencies and learn the key environmental factors in creating an innovative culture. The Webcast will also cover the politics of innovation in complex organizations.
 
For more information about these and other upcoming learning opportunities, please visit the ACRL eLearning page at http://www.acrl.org/ala/acrl/acrlproftools/elearning.cfm.
 
Direct questions to Jon Stahler at jstahler@ala.org or call (312) 280-2511.

TLA’s online webinars

I got this one through email:

Texas Library Association’s contract with Neal-Schuman Professional Education Network is winding down, so I’m letting librarians know about some of the upcoming courses still available through that service. These courses are live library-related trainings with an expert instructor, but they are all either by conference call or online to avoid travel costs.

Topics include web design, copyright, maps, and RSS.

Early-bird registration through TLA means a 10% discount – but more than that, Neal-Schuman does not mind if you pack a room with as many library staff as you can. It would still be one registration fee even if 10 or 20 people (or more) participate in one room. Audio conferences normally cost $85 and web conferences normally cost $109, but again you have both the TLA discount and the possibility of multiple participants on one registration. For a web conference, you could hook your computer to an LCD projector and put 10 people in a room for only $9.81 per person.

A registration link is included with each course description below. There are more courses offered on their home page, but I’ve picked out the ones of special interest to academic libraries.

Library Web Site Usability Tools and Techniques: the Essentials

Thursday, September 11th, 2:00 pm
1-hour Web Conference with Terry Nikkel

http://www.neal-schumanpen.com/partnership/bins/calendar_page.asp?cid=2298

Ask typical users where they being their research on just about any topic, and nine out of 10 will tell you they use the Internet, for example Google, Yahoo!, or Wikipedia. Maybe two out of 100 will say they use the library. Despite the abundance—and accuracy—of information available on library Web sites, users often discover quickly that they involve confusing terms and syntax, or convoluted navigation and search procedures. One poor experience, and the library will lose yet another user to more familiar, intuitive information portals.

Copyright Issues in Distance Education

Friday, September 12th, 1:00 pm
1-hour Audio Conference with Arlene Bielefield

http://www.neal-schumanpen.com/partnership/bins/calendar_page.asp?cid=2139

Copyright is an issue that has remained on the leading edge of information because of the amount currently available. The Internet, distance education, and continuing emergence of new technologies are only a few examples of influences causing librarians and educators to be wary about copyright matters. Copyright is further complicated by legal verbiage that perplexes many. So where does a practicing librarian, educator, or promising researcher look for copyright information?

Cool Tools for Library Webmasters

Tuesday, September 9th, 1:00 pm
1-hour Web Conference with Darlene Fichter and Frank Cervone

http://www.neal-schumanpen.com/partnership/bins/calendar_page.asp?cid=2301

Tech Tuesdays: Talking with Techies Series

The Hidden Potential of Maps

Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 2:00 pm ET

1-hour Web Conference with Danial Duda

http://www.neal-schumanpen.com/partnership/bins/calendar_page.asp

Many people may not realize how rich a resource a map can be. A map is one of those resources that can answer many questions for many people: genealogists, historians, political scientists, sociologists, emergency response teams, police departments, military, and creative writers. This session will explain and give examples of these different approaches and where you can find more information about them.

Fast and Easy Site Tune-ups

Tuesday, October 7, 2008, 1:00 pm ET

1-hour Web Conference with Jeff Wisniewski

http://www.neal-schumanpen.com/partnership/bins/calendar_page.asp

Looking for ways to speed up, clean up, and optimize your site with minimal effort? These 35 1-minute upgrades show you how to fine-tune your sites code, design, and structure to make your site faster, more flexible, and more standards-compliant. Do one, do 10, or do them all to maximize your sites performance in minimal time.

The Secret to User-Centered Web Sites: Cheap, Easy & Effective Usability Techniques

Tuesday, October 21, 2008, 1:00 pm ET

1-hour Web Conference with Erica Reynolds

http://www.neal-schumanpen.com/partnership/bins/calendar_page.asp

Effective usability studies start before you ever write a line of code or design a single graphic. By using a variety of card sorting techniques and paper prototypes you can save tons of time, money, and stress. Discover the super-secret advantages for creating useful and usable Web sites and engaged staff and users by doing iterative testing. Take away tips to save you time and apply the results of your tests.

Creative Commons (CC): Copyright Alternative?

Tuesday, October 28, 2008, 1:00 pm ET

1-hour Web Conference with Michael Sauers

http://www.neal-schumanpen.com/partnership/bins/calendar_page.asp

With the debate over copyright raging, with some calling for the end of the “all rights reserved” regime, and libraries feeling like they’re caught in the middle, just what are the alternatives? CC is the most respected alternative available today with its idea of “some rights reserved” as set by the content creators themselves. Sauers talks about the principles of Creative Commons, shows how you can easily apply it to your intellectual property today, and how you can use CC to find material that you can legally reuse in the creation of new content.

Recent Trends in Digital Licensing

Thursday, November 6, 2008, 1:00 pm ET

1-hour Web Conference with Tomas A. Lipinski

http://www.neal-schumanpen.com/partnership/bins/calendar_page.asp

With the advent of full-text digital content becoming much more accessible in terms of quantity and quality, librarians are finding they need to become increasingly knowledgeable about negotiating various types of licenses. There is a lot to learn, and there are frequent changes and new formats to deal with! This session will introduce participants to key concepts and trends in the licensing of information content, as well as services for the library and related information settings. It includes a review of the law and the practice of licensing. An introduction to on-line contracting is included i.e. the EULA (end-user license agreement) common with many Web sites. The speaker has just completed researching and writing a full book on this topic, which should be available by the date of this session.

RSS: Let the information find you – then pass it on!

Tuesday, November 25, 2008, 1:00 pm ET

1-hour Web Conference with Wendy Rodgers

http://www.neal-schumanpen.com/partnership/bins/calendar_page.asp

RSS technology has been around for 10 years. Depending on where you look, it either “hasn’t really caught on” or it is “the next killer app”.  RSS feeds are an effective method of what one writer calls “information trapping.”  Another suggests that “as technological awareness grows [about tools like RSS], Googling anything becomes less necessary.” Taking advantage of RSS is now easier than ever.  Libraries can deliver RSS feeds as an information service to users, or use RSS for professional development and current awareness for staff.  Attend this session to find out what RSS is, how to consume it, how to deliver it, and how it can benefit your library.

InfoCamp Seattle 2008

Are you a librarian into user experience design? Got a website, content delivery service, or really cool idea you want to try out on a diverse professional audience?  Want to share ideas and enthusiasm with librarians, information architects, usability engineers, user experience designers, and other information professionals?

You can do just that at InfoCamp Seattle 2008, an unconference for the user-centered information industry! It’ll be in beautiful Seattle, in a renovated historic schoolhouse now called the Youngstown Cultural Arts Center.  Save the date now: September 27-28, 2008.

Last year, a wide range of professionals and students participated in InfoCamp.  Here’s what one of them said about it:

“InfoCamp was great, and I highly encourage people to look for it next year, and also to look at other unconferences that are happening.”
–Sam Wallin (http://supercrazylibrarianguy.wordpress.com/2007/10/15/barcampinfocamp
– Used with author’s permission)

We hope you’ll consider participating in InfoCamp this September 27-28!

Learn more at http://www.infocamp.info or contact us at infocampseattle@gmail.com.

Register Now for Upcoming eLearning Events from ACRL

Registration is closing soon for the following eLearning events. Space in these events is limited, so reserve your spot today! For more information including rates on these courses, please visit the course page.

Information Commons 101: Principles and Good Practices

July 22, 2008

11 a.m. Pacific | 12:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 p.m. Eastern

http://www.acrl.org/ala/acrl/acrlproftools/infocommons101.cfm

Is your institution in the planning phase for a library renovation or addition that includes a space that will serve as an information or learning commons? If so, this webcast will provide an overview of some of the key planning components you should take into consideration as you develop a program for the facility.

Instructor:

Joan K. Lippincott, Associate Executive Director – Coalition for Networked Information

Copyright and the Library Part 1: The Basics Including Fair Use

July 14 – August 1, 2008

http://www.acrl.org/ala/acrl/acrlproftools/copyright1.cfm

Course Description:

In this course, students will learn to think in terms of U.S. copyright law. Students will focus on building understanding of current copyright law, creating a “copyright palette” for their libraries, and assessing a library’s legal risk with regard to current U.S. copyright law. Additionally, students will build an understanding of the Fair Use clause, as well as how to legally apply fair use in the library, classroom, and broader campus environments.

Instructor:

Tomas A. Lipinski, J.D., LL.M., Ph.D.

Leading Change

Live Webcast: July 15, 2008

11 a.m. Pacific | 12:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 p.m. Eastern

http://www.acrl.org/ala/acrl/acrlproftools/leadingchange.cfm

Webcast Description:

How can we better understand the effects of change on our organizations and on the people in them? During this webcast, Kathryn Deiss will provide several models which can serve as lenses through which to view change. Tools such as the models and techniques for helping people through change will be provided.

Presenter:

Kathryn J. Deiss, Content Strategist – ACRL

Designing Websites for the Academic Library

July 14 – August 8, 2008

http://www.acrl.org/ala/acrl/acrlproftools/webdesign.cfm

Course Description:

This course focuses on the basics of Web site planning and design and content development with a concentration on academic libraries. The course will also examine Web standards, usability, and accessibility. XHTML and CSS (external) will be introduced. Students will be expected to be able to create a basic HTML Web page before beginning the course. However XHTML/HTML basics tutorials will be provided for those who need more practice. Students will plan and design a representative site during the course.

Instructor: Diane Kovacs, Kovacs Consulting

For more information about these and other upcoming learning opportunities, please visit the ACRL eLearning page at http://www.acrl.org/ala/acrl/acrlproftools/elearnign.cfm.

Register Now For Upcoming e-Learning Opportunities from ACRL

Registration is now open for the following e-Learning courses.  Reserve your seat today for these exciting new seminars!

Copyright and the Library Part 1: The Basics Including Fair Use

July 14 – August 1, 2008
Register Online

Course Description:
In this course, students will learn to think in terms of U.S. copyright law. Students will focus on building understanding of current copyright law, creating a “copyright palette” for their libraries, and assessing a library’s legal risk with regard to current U.S. copyright law. Additionally, students will build an understanding of the Fair Use clause, as well as how to legally apply fair use in the library, classroom, and broader campus environments.

Instructor:
Tomas A. Lipinski, J.D., LL.M., Ph.D.

Professor Lipinski currently teaches, researches and speaks frequently on various topics within the areas of information law and policy, especially copyright, free speech and privacy issues in schools and libraries. In fall of 2005, Professor Lipinski was placed on the Fulbright Senior Specialist Roster (“The Fulbright Senior Specialists Program differs from the traditional Fulbright Scholar competition in that the Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES) builds a roster of specialists in a variety of disciplines through an open application process.

Visit the course page for more information, including learning outcomes and registration rates.

Leading Change

Live Webcast: July 15, 2008
11 a.m. Pacific | 12:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 p.m. Eastern
Register Online

Webcast Description:
How can we better understand the effects of change on our organizations and on the people in them? During this webcast, Kathryn Deiss will provide several models which can serve as lenses through which to view change. Tools such as the models and techniques for helping people through change will be provided.

Presenter:
Kathryn J. Deiss

Kathryn J. Deiss is the Content Strategist for the Association of College & Research Libraries at the American Library Association in Chicago, USA. In this role she scans the research library world for trends and best practices, acquires content to publish, and provides organizational consulting services to institutions. She designs and provides training and facilitation for libraries, national associations, consortia, and museums in the United States and beyond. Kathryn has written and presented extensively on the subjects of leadership, innovation, coaching and mentoring, planning, organizational learning, and organizational culture. Kathryn received her B.A. in Sociology from Trinity University (San Antonio, TX) and her MLS from the University at Albany.

Visit the course page for more information, including learning outcomes and registration rates.

Creating A Comprehensive Plan for Information Literacy

July 7 – 28, 2008
Register Online

Course Description:
This course will provide you with the information you need to create a comprehensive plan for information literacy for your institution. The course will cover:

  • planning;
  • setting goals and objectives;
  • how to organize and prioritize ideas;
  • the writing process;
  • and the creation of a draft plan.

You will be guided through the process of developing a comprehensive plan using worksheets developed by the presenter, participating in weekly on-line chats, and comparing examples of completed plans from a variety of institutions. Participants will learn how to establish and convene working groups, consider various means for collecting information and getting “buy-in” across campus, create a strategy for writing the plan, identify and select essential and optional components of a model plan, and put a draft of the plan on paper.

Instructor:
Joanna Burkhardt, head librarian, University of Rhode Island-Providence.

Visit the course page for more information, including learning outcomes and registration rates.

Designing Websites for the Academic Library

July 14 – August 8, 2008
register online

Course Description:
This course focuses on the basics of Web site planning and design and content development with a concentration on academic libraries. The course will also examine Web standards, usability, and accessibility. XHTML and CSS (external) will be introduced. Students will be expected to be able to create a basic HTML Web page before beginning the course. However XHTML/HTML basics tutorials will be provided for those who need more practice. Students will plan and design a representative site during the course.

Instructor:
Diane Kovacs, Kovacs Consulting

The instructor has been teaching Web Design and related topics for more than 14 years including LIS590LWL Designing Web Sites for Organizations for the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign GSLIS LEEP program. She is the author of The Kovacs Guide to Electronic Library Collection Development: Essential Core Subject Collections, Selection Criteria, and Guidelines (Neal-Schuman, January 2004) and The Virtual Reference Handbook: Interview and Information Delivery Techniques for the Chat and E-Mail Environments by Kovacs, Diane K. Neal-Schuman Publishers (2007) published concurrently in the United Kingdom by Facet Publishers (2007).

Visit the course page for more information, including learning outcomes and registration rates.

For more information about these and other upcoming learning opportunities, please visit the ACRL eLearning page. Questions?  Contact Jon Stahler via e-mail at jstahler@ala.org or via phone at (312) 280-2511.

from the ACRL Insider