Best Practices for Library Website User Experience

“Best Practices for Library Website User Experience”
Date: Wednesday, April 16 @ 3 PM EDT
Register here: http://easybib.enterthemeeting.com/m/RRZMG2CV

As more and more library content is available digitally, the library website
has become the main face of the library. What can we do to make these websites
an effective place for our students and users?

Donna Lanclos, Library Ethnographer, and Somaly Kim Wu, Digital Scholarship
Librarian of UNC-Charlotte will discuss their efforts to inform the redesign of
the library website based on their observations of student usage.

All registrants will receive a recording of the webinar (even if you can’t make
the live event!). Those who attend the live event will receive a PD certificate
of completion.

An ACRL E-Learning Seminar – January 25 – February 10, 2010 “Designing Usable and Accessible Web Pages: Needs Analysis, Design Planning, XHTML and CSS Standards, Accessibility Validation, and Usability Testing (beginners)

via LIBREF-L

Designing Usable and Accessible Web Pages:  Needs Analysis, Design Planning, XHTML and CSS Standards, Accessibility Validation, and Usability Testing (beginners)

An ACRL E-Learning Seminar – January 25 – February 10, 2010

Registration is now open! – http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/elearning/courses/webdesign.cfm

Course Description:

This hands-on course focuses on the basics of Web site planning, design and content development. The course will also examine Web standards, usability, and accessibility. XHTML and CSS (external) will be introduced. The course begins with XHTML/HTML basics tutorials and a practice activity to make sure everyone has the basic skills. Students will plan and design a representative site during the course.

This is a primarily asynchronous seminar, allowing participants to work through course material at times convenient to them. The instructor will provide feedback to all completed work via email. Participants may also choose to schedule online chat time with the teacher, as they feel necessary.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

* Plan and design a Web site for Usability and simple Accessibility for selected users/groups.
* Understand and apply Web Standards
* Develop basic Web site contents for selected users/groups.
* Use DreamWeaver (MX2004 or higher preferred) or a text editor to create usable, accessible, and interesting Web pages. You may use Microsoft Expression (was FrontPage) or other HTML editor if you already know what you are doing with it.

Participants will end the session with a draft Web site plan, design, and a Web page (or pages) that will allow minimal accessibility validation and usability testing.

Weekly Schedule

* Week 1: User Centered Design: Needs Assessment and Design Planning
* Topic 2. HTML/XHTML (XHTML Standards)  Basic Concepts: Creating a Basic Web Page
* Week 3: CSS for Style and Layout (External CSSLevel2 Standard)
* Week 4: Accessibility Validation and Usability Testing

This seminar will be delivered through ACRL’s Moodle.

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this course, you will be able to:

* Understand and apply Web Standards
* Plan and design a Web site for Usability and Accessibility for selected users/groups.
* Develop basic Web site contents for selected users/groups.
* Use DreamWeaver or a text editor (MX2004 or higher preferred) to create usable, accessible, and interesting Web pages. You may use FrontPage if you already know what you are doing with it.

Participants will end the session with a draft Web site plan, design, and a Web page (or pages  )that will allow minimal accessibility validation and usability testing.

Course Materials:

All of the required readings and activities for the course will be available on-line but it will be useful to have available the references in the Recommended Materials listed below.

* Graph Paper for laying out CSS design.
* Lynch, Patrick J., and Horton, Sarah. 2009. Web Style Guide: Basic Design Principles for Creating Web Sites, 3rd. Ed. New Haven:Yale University Press. http://www.webstyleguide.com/index.html
* Freeman, Elisabeth and Eric (2005).  Head First HTML with CSS & XHTML*. O’Reilly. ISBN: 0-596-10197-X
* Niederst Robbins, Jennifer (2006). Web Design in a Nutshell , 3rd Ed. O’Reilly. ISBN: 0-596-00987-9
* Meyer, Eric (2007). CSS Pocket Reference, 3rd. Ed. O’Reilly. ISBN 10: 0-596-51505-7 | ISBN 13:9780596515058 (9.99 list price)
* Bickner, Carrie. (2004) Web Design on a Shoestring. New Riders Publishing: Boston ISBN 0-7357-1328-6
* Norman, Donald (any edition).. The Design of Everyday Things. Basic Books ISBN: 0-385-26774-6

*Strongly recommended for those students who come to class with no HTML experience.

Audience:

Librarians and other information specialists who want to learn to design usable, accessible, standard Web pages that will attract the intended users and encourage and invite them to persist and return to the site.

Experience working with the academic library patrons in any subject area chosen is assumed. Level of instruction is intermediate in regard to academic library experience, beginner in regard to XHTML/CSS and Web design experience.

Participants must understand paths — directories or folders and where files are saved — in a Windows or Mac OS environment. FTP or other experience uploading Web pages to a Web server will be expected. Some basic assistance will be provided.

Instructor:

Diane Kovacs, Kovacs Consulting – http://www.kovacs.com

The instructor has been teaching Web Design and related topics for more than 14 years including LIS590LWL Designing Web Sites for Organizations for the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign GSLIS LEEP program. She is the author of The Kovacs Guide to Electronic Library Collection Development: Essential Core Subject Collections, Selection Criteria, and Guidelines (Neal-Schuman, January 2004) and The Virtual Reference Handbook: Interview and Information Delivery Techniques for the Chat and E-Mail Environments by Kovacs, Diane K. Neal-Schuman Publishers (2007) published concurrently in the United Kingdom by Facet Publishers (2007)

More information on Diane Kovacs

Course Requirements:

Your participation will require approximately three to five hours per week to:

* Read the online seminar material
* Post to online discussion boards
* Complete activities, which will result in a basic draft academic library oriented Web site
* Complete a seminar evaluation form

Registration – http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/elearning/courses/webdesign.cfm

ACRL member: $150
ALA member: $195
CACUL member: Can $205 (charges will be made in U.S. dollars)
Nonmember: $205
Student: $65

Register Now for Upcoming ACRL e-Learning Opportunities

via email

Registration is now open for the following e-learning opportunities from ACRL. Stretch your professional development budget by registering now for these affordable distance learning courses and events! For more information on each course, including a link to online registration and registration fees, please visit the course page by clicking the course title. Space is limited, so register now to reserve your seat!

Registration for all online seminars and Webcasts starting after September 1, 2009 qualifies for the new Frequent Learner Program. Register for three, get one free.

Keep up-to-date with upcoming ACRL e-Learning opportunities by subscribing to our RSS feed.

August

Cyber Zed Shed Webcast Series 1: Facebook, Twitter, and Sprout (Live Webcast: August 18, 2009) – Miss the ACRL 14th National Conference in Seattle or one of the Cyber Zed Shed presentations? Now is your chance to check out what you may have missed!  The first in a series of Cyber Zed Shed Webcasts will be feature 20 minute presentations on Facebook, Twitter and Sprout with ample time for questions and discussion.

September

Web Design and Construction for Libraries Part 1: XHTML and CSS (Online Seminar: September 7 – October 2, 2009) – This course focuses on the basics of Web site planning and design and content development with a concentration on academic libraries. The course will also examine Web standards, usability, and accessibility. XHTML and CSS (external) will be introduced. Students will plan and design a representative site during the course.

Introduction to Website Usability (Online Seminar: September 14 – October 2, 2009) – For very little investment in staff hours and training you can reap tremendous benefits by connecting with the users of your library Web site and web based applications through usability testing. This three-week course is designed for the librarian or library IT staff person who is interested in setting up a usability program but doesn’t know where to begin.

Information Commons 101 (Live Webcast: September 22, 2009)
Is your institution in the planning phase for a library renovation or addition that includes a space that will serve as an information or learning commons?  If so, this Webcast will provide an overview of some of the key planning components you should take into consideration as you develop a program for the facility.

October

Instructional Design for Online Teaching and Learning (Online Seminar: October 5-31, 2009)
In this hands-on course the intellectual focus will be on using good instructional design and Web page design principles. Participants will also be introduced to Web-based Teaching techniques and materials using standard Web pages and the Moodle LMS. Coursework will result in a completed instructional design plan for an instructional unit.

Copyright and the Library Part 1: The Basics Including the DMCA (Online Seminar: October 5 – 23, 2009)
This course will focus on building understanding of current copyright law, creating a “copyright palette” for partcipants’ libraries, and assessing a library’s legal risk with regard to current U.S. copyright law. Additionally, participants will build an understanding of the Fair Use clause, as well as how to legally apply fair use in the library, classroom and broader campus environments.

Next Generation Information Commons: Retooling and Refining the Vision (Live Webcast: October 13, 2009)
Some information commons are now more than ten years old and are in need of refreshing in terms of conception, configuration, technologies, and services. Others are so popular that additions are planned, either adjacent to the existing commons, on other floors, or in other buildings on campus. Through the use of principles and practical examples, participants will learn about trends in information and learning commons.

The Role of the Librarian in Combating Student Plagiarism (Live Webcast: October 20, 2009)
Like other educators, librarians are aware of the growing instances of student plagiarism and academic dishonesty that take place on college campuses. Librarians frequently discuss discipline faculty’s revulsion toward the growth of student plagiarism that has seemingly grown in tandem with our society’s dependence on digital texts found on the Internet. This Webcast examines strategies libraries and librarians can implement to reduce plagiarism on campus.

Complete details are available on the ACRL e-Learning Web site. For more information about ACRL e-Learning opportunities, contact ACRL Web Services Manager Jon Stahler at jstahler@ala.org.

John Stalin Access U – Accessibility/Usability Conference May 11-13

John Stalin Access U
at St. Edward’s University in Austin
Monday May 11th and Tuesday, May 12th, 2009
http://www.knowbility.org/conference/

Knowbility’s annual training institute, produced for six years in partnership with St Edward’s University offers two days of classes focused on accessible information technology with options for advanced training and certificate programs for usability professionals.

Register now for upcoming e-Learning opportunities

Registration is now open for the following e-learning opportunities from ACRL. Stretch your professional budget by registering now for these affordable distance learning courses and events! Space is limited, so register now to reserve your seat!

Multi-week Courses:

Introduction to Website Usability

March 23-April 10, 2009

For very little investment in staff hours and training you can reap tremendous benefits by connecting with the users of your library website and Web based applications through usability testing. This three-week course is designed for the librarian or library IT staff person who is interested in setting up a usability program but doesn’t know where to begin.

For more information about this course, including pricing and a link to online registration, please visit
http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/courses/Website_Usability.cfm

Implementing Online Teaching and Learning: Using Moodle and Other Web 2.0 Features

April 6 – May 2, 2009

In this four week hands-on course we will overview of the state-of-the-art of online teaching and learning technology and its applications. We will review the use of teaching materials created with multi-media plug-ins and classroom communications tools and specifically the Moodle LMS (Learning Management System).

For more information about this course, including pricing and a link to online registration, please visit
http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/courses/OnlineTeaching.cfm

Copyright and the Library Part 2: Library, Classroom and Other Issues Including the DMCA

April 6 – 24, 2009

In this course, students will continue to learn to think in terms of U.S. copyright law. In this course, students will focus on issues pertaining to Libraries with a special focus on how copyright pertains to the classroom setting. Sections 108, 109, 110, 512 and 1201 will be examined for a thorough understanding on their impact in academic libraries.

For more information about this course, including pricing and a link to online registration, please visit
http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/courses/copyright2.cfm

Live Webcasts:

Next Generation Information Commons
March 31, 2009 – 2PM Eastern

Some information commons are now more than ten years old and are in need of refreshing in terms of conception, configuration, technologies, and services. Others are so popular that additions are planned, either adjacent to the existing commons, on other floors, or in other buildings on campus. Through the use of principles and practical examples, participants will learn about trends in information and learning commons. A wide variety of photos will be used to illustrate the presentation

For more information about this webcast, including pricing and a link to online registration, please visit
http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/courses/nextgeninfocommons.cfm

Program Review for Academic Libraries

April 14, 2009 – 2PM Eastern

Institutional program review guidelines often list the library as a resource for departments undergoing review. However, more academic libraries are being included in their institution ‘s review cycle and asked to undergo program review themselves. This session will introduce academic program review; discuss what is involved in putting together a program review for an academic library; and present questions to consider in working through the program review process.

For more information about this webcast, including pricing and a link to online registration, please visit
http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/courses/programreview.cfm

User Experience (Blended Librarianship)

April 23, 2009 – 2PM Eastern

This webcast serves to help participants identify techniques and tools that will enable academic librarians, faculty members, information technologists, instructional design professionals, et al. to discover or develop and implement new approaches for collaboration, to achieve maximum integration of the library into the teaching and learning process throughout their institutions. To help guide such collaborative efforts toward library, curricular, and other related institutional goals – especially those of advancing information literacy.

For more information about this webcast, including pricing and a link to online registration, please visit
http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/courses/userexperience.cfm

For more information about any of the above courses or webcasts, please contact ACRL Web Services Manager Jon Stahler at jstahler@ala.org.

Registration deadline approaching for web usability course

Introduction to Website Usability

Format: ACRL Online Seminar

Dates: October 6-24, 2008

Presenter: Nora Dimmock

Description:
For very little investment in staff hours and training you can reap tremendous benefits by connecting with the users of your library website and web based applications through usability testing. This three-week course is designed for the librarian or library IT staff person who is interested in setting up a usability program but doesn’t know where to begin. Through a combination of reading assignments, online discussions, and hands-on activities, students will:

  • Deepen their understanding of the value of usability testing when developing new web-based systems and services for their library.
  • Develop a test protocol that meets their institutions requirements for research studies involving human subjects testing.
  • Devise a strategy for recruiting test subjects from different user groups.
  • Learn the most commonly used types of tests and where they fit into the iterative design cycle.

For more information on this event as well as registration, please visit the event page.

Registration for this event is limited, so reserve your seat today!  October 3 is the deadline to register.

Questions?  Please contact Jon Stahler at jstahler@ala.org.

via ACRL Insider