Register Now for Upcoming ACRL e-Learning Opportunities

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Registration is now open for the following e-learning opportunities from ACRL. Stretch your professional development budget by registering now for these affordable distance learning courses and events! For more information on each course, including a link to online registration and registration fees, please visit the course page by clicking the course title. Space is limited, so register now to reserve your seat!

Registration for all online seminars and Webcasts starting after September 1, 2009 qualifies for the new Frequent Learner Program. Register for three, get one free.

Keep up-to-date with upcoming ACRL e-Learning opportunities by subscribing to our RSS feed.

August

Cyber Zed Shed Webcast Series 1: Facebook, Twitter, and Sprout (Live Webcast: August 18, 2009) – Miss the ACRL 14th National Conference in Seattle or one of the Cyber Zed Shed presentations? Now is your chance to check out what you may have missed!  The first in a series of Cyber Zed Shed Webcasts will be feature 20 minute presentations on Facebook, Twitter and Sprout with ample time for questions and discussion.

September

Web Design and Construction for Libraries Part 1: XHTML and CSS (Online Seminar: September 7 – October 2, 2009) – This course focuses on the basics of Web site planning and design and content development with a concentration on academic libraries. The course will also examine Web standards, usability, and accessibility. XHTML and CSS (external) will be introduced. Students will plan and design a representative site during the course.

Introduction to Website Usability (Online Seminar: September 14 – October 2, 2009) – For very little investment in staff hours and training you can reap tremendous benefits by connecting with the users of your library Web site and web based applications through usability testing. This three-week course is designed for the librarian or library IT staff person who is interested in setting up a usability program but doesn’t know where to begin.

Information Commons 101 (Live Webcast: September 22, 2009)
Is your institution in the planning phase for a library renovation or addition that includes a space that will serve as an information or learning commons?  If so, this Webcast will provide an overview of some of the key planning components you should take into consideration as you develop a program for the facility.

October

Instructional Design for Online Teaching and Learning (Online Seminar: October 5-31, 2009)
In this hands-on course the intellectual focus will be on using good instructional design and Web page design principles. Participants will also be introduced to Web-based Teaching techniques and materials using standard Web pages and the Moodle LMS. Coursework will result in a completed instructional design plan for an instructional unit.

Copyright and the Library Part 1: The Basics Including the DMCA (Online Seminar: October 5 – 23, 2009)
This course will focus on building understanding of current copyright law, creating a “copyright palette” for partcipants’ libraries, and assessing a library’s legal risk with regard to current U.S. copyright law. Additionally, participants will build an understanding of the Fair Use clause, as well as how to legally apply fair use in the library, classroom and broader campus environments.

Next Generation Information Commons: Retooling and Refining the Vision (Live Webcast: October 13, 2009)
Some information commons are now more than ten years old and are in need of refreshing in terms of conception, configuration, technologies, and services. Others are so popular that additions are planned, either adjacent to the existing commons, on other floors, or in other buildings on campus. Through the use of principles and practical examples, participants will learn about trends in information and learning commons.

The Role of the Librarian in Combating Student Plagiarism (Live Webcast: October 20, 2009)
Like other educators, librarians are aware of the growing instances of student plagiarism and academic dishonesty that take place on college campuses. Librarians frequently discuss discipline faculty’s revulsion toward the growth of student plagiarism that has seemingly grown in tandem with our society’s dependence on digital texts found on the Internet. This Webcast examines strategies libraries and librarians can implement to reduce plagiarism on campus.

Complete details are available on the ACRL e-Learning Web site. For more information about ACRL e-Learning opportunities, contact ACRL Web Services Manager Jon Stahler at jstahler@ala.org.

Registration Closing Soon for Upcoming ACRL e-Learning events!

ACRL is hosting two upcoming, affordable e-Learning opportunities pertaining to plagiarism and copyright law.  Registration for these events will close soon, so reserve your spot today! Details for each event are below:

The Role of the Librarian in Combating Student Plagiarism
February 5, 2009 – 1PM CST

Webcast Description:
Like other educators, librarians are aware of the growing instances of student plagiarism and academic dishonesty that take place on college campuses. Librarians frequently anecdotally discuss discipline faculty’s revulsion toward the growth of student plagiarism that has seemingly grown in tandem with our society’s dependence on digital texts found on the Internet. We acknowledge that this problem is often an effective hook to convince reluctant faculty to bring students into the library for instruction.  However once we get these professors and students into our library classrooms, we typically have a hard time presenting curricular content that focuses on anti-plagiarism student learning outcomes and/or developing additional outreach techniques that can be included in information literacy outreach and instruction to both faculty and students.

Registration fees:
ACRL member: $50
ALA member: $75
CACUL member: Can$90 (charges will be made in U.S. dollars)
Nonmember: $90
Student: $40

Group: $295

For more details on this event, including registration, please visit http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/courses/plagiarism.cfm

Copyright and the Library Part 1: The Basics Including Fair Use
February 9 – 27, 2009 (asynchronous)

Course Description:
In this course, students will learn to think in terms of U.S. copyright law. Students will focus on building understanding of current copyright law, creating a “copyright palette” for their libraries, and assessing a library’s legal risk with regard to current U.S. copyright law. Additionally, students will build an understanding of the Fair Use clause, as well as how to legally apply fair use in the library, classroom, and broader campus environments.

Registration fees:
ACRL member: $135
ALA member: $175
CACUL member: Can$195 (charges will be made in U.S. dollars)
Nonmember: $195
Student: $60

For more details on this event, including registration, please visit http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/proftools/courses/copyright1.cfm

Questions about ACRL e-Learning courses and events?  Please contact Jon Stahler (jstahler@ala.org) at (800) 545-2433 x2511!

The Role of the Librarian in Combating Student Plagiarism

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Live Webcast
February 5, 2009

11 a.m Pacific | 12:00 p.m. Mountain | 1:00 p.m. Central | 2:00 p.m. Eastern

1.5 hours

Registration is now open!

Registered Participants: If you need assistance with accessing the Webcast the day of the event please call LearningTimes at (877) 586-6546 (within USA) or (212) 420-6052 (outside USA), or e-mail help@learningtimes.net.

Webcast Description:
Like other educators, librarians are aware of the growing instances of student plagiarism and academic dishonesty that take place on college campuses. Librarians frequently anecdotally discuss discipline faculty’s revulsion toward the growth of student plagiarism that has seemingly grown in tandem with our society’s dependence on digital texts found on the Internet. We acknowledge that this problem is often an effective hook to convince reluctant faculty to bring students into the library for instruction.  However once we get these professors and students into our library classrooms, we typically have a hard time presenting curricular content that focuses on anti-plagiarism student learning outcomes and/or developing additional outreach techniques that can be included in information literacy outreach and instruction to both faculty and students.

This session will explore:

  • The role of the academic librarian in combating student plagiarism.
  • The “culture of copy” that our students inhabit and why plagiarism poses problems for higher education professionals including academic librarians.
  • Why use of discipline based approaches helps combat plagiarism effectively
  • The professional literature on plagiarism from multi-disciplinary viewpoints
  • Effective ways to reach out to faculty grappling with plagiarism issues in their classrooms
  • How to design effective information literacy session assignments to help students understand how they can avoid plagiarism
  • The current limitations of efforts to combat plagiarism within higher education and academic librarianship

This e-learning workshop is adapted from Lynn Lampert’s half-day 2006 Midwinter ACRL Pre-conference entitled, “Combating the Culture of Copy: Information Literacy Interventions for Plagiarism.”

Presenter:
Lynn D. Lampert is the Chair of Reference and Instructional Services and Coordinator of Information Literacy and Instruction at California State University (CSU)-Northridge. She has specialized in the area of information literacy instruction since she began her professional career as an academic librarian in 1998. Before joining the faculty at CSU-Northridge in 2001, she served as a librarian at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks, California.

Lynn’s most recent writings focusing on issues of academic librarianship and student plagiarism include her book on the topic: Combating Student Plagiarism: An Academic Librarian’s Guide published by Chandos Publishing (Oxford Limited) in July of 2008 and a chapter entitled “Academic Integrity” published in the Information Literacy Instruction Handbook edited by Cox and Lindsay just released by ACRL.  Lynn has also authored articles on the topic including, “The Instruction Librarian’s Role in Discussing Issues of Academic Integrity” which appeared in The LOEX Quarterly in 2006 and “Integrating discipline-based plagiarism instruction into the information literacy curriculum” which appeared in Reference Services Review in December of 2004.

Lynn has authored many other publications in the field of information literacy, both within and outside the field of library and information science, appearing in such publications as The Reference Librarian, The American Historical Association’s Publication Perspectives, and ACRL’s C&RL News.  She has also recently co-edited Proven Strategies for Building an Information Literacy Program, co-edited with Dr. Susan C. Curzon. She frequently presents on critical issues in information literacy practices and library instructional programming at both the national and regional level.  Lynn is an active member of ACRL’s Instruction Section and the California chapter of ACRL, CARL (California Association of Research Libraries).

Lynn received both her M.L.I.S. in library and information science and her M.A. in history from the University of California-Los Angeles in 1998. She has a B.A. in History from the University of California-Santa Barbara, 1994.

Technical Requirements:
This Webcast will be held in a virtual classroom. You will be prompted to download a java-based application (Elluminate) before being able to enter the classroom.

Minimum system requirements can be found at: http://www.elluminate.com/support/faqs/min_requirements.jsp

If you’d like to test your computer to make sure you can use the Elluminate classroom software on it, go to: https://www.elluminate.com/mtg.jnlp?password=configuration

Speakers or a headset for listening to the presentation are required. It is recommended that you also use a microphone to ask questions/make comments. If you do not have or do not wish to use a microphone, you may ask questions through text-based chat.

Registration
ACRL member: $50
ALA member: $75
CACUL member: Can$90 (charges will be made in U.S. dollars)
Nonmember: $90
Student: $40

Group*: $295

* Webcasts take place in an interactive, online classroom environment with one user/one login. If you select the group rate, one person must register, login, and keyboard during the event. A group registration allows an institution to project the Webcast to participants in the same location.

New eLearning Opportunities Available from ACRL

ACRL is excited to announce registration for upcoming eLearning events!  Space is limited, so reserve your seat today!

The Role of the Librarian in Combating Student Plagiarism

Format: 90 Minute Webcast
Date: September 23, 2008 – 11 A.M. Pacific | 12:00 P.M. Mountain | 1:00 P.M. Central | 2:00 P.M. Eastern

Presenter: Lynn Lamper

Description

Like other educators, librarians are aware of the growing instances of student plagiarism and academic dishonesty that take place on college campuses. Librarians frequently anecdotally discuss discipline faculty’s revulsion toward the growth of student plagiarism that has seemingly grown in tandem with our society’s dependence on digital texts found on the Internet. We acknowledge that this problem is often an effective hook to convince reluctant faculty to bring students into the library for instruction.  However once we get these professors and students into our library classrooms, we typically have a hard time presenting curricular content that focuses on anti-plagiarism student learning outcomes and/or developing additional outreach techniques that can be included in information literacy outreach and instruction to both faculty and students.

For more information on this event as well as registration, please visit the event page at http://www.acrl.org/ala/acrl/acrlproftools/plagiarism.cfm.  Registration for this event is limited, so reserve your seat today!

Introduction to Website Usability

Format: ACRL Online Seminar

Dates: October 6-24, 2008

Presenter: Nora Dimmock

Description:
For very little investment in staff hours and training you can reap tremendous benefits by connecting with the users of your library website and web based applications through usability testing. This three-week course is designed for the librarian or library IT staff person who is interested in setting up a usability program but doesn’t know where to begin. Through a combination of reading assignments, online discussions, and hands-on activities, students will:

·  Deepen their understanding of the value of usability testing when developing new web-based systems and services for their library.

·  Develop a test protocol that meets their institutions requirements for research studies involving human subjects testing.

·  Devise a strategy for recruiting test subjects from different user groups.

·  Learn the most commonly used types of tests and where they fit into the iterative design cycle.

For more information on this event as well as registration, please visit the event page at http://www.acrl.org/ala/acrl/acrlproftools/Website_Usability.cfm. Registration for this event is limited, so reserve your seat today!.

* Webcasts take place in an interactive, online classroom environment with one user/one login. If you select the group rate, one person must register, login, and keyboard during the event. A group registration allows an institution to project the Webcast to participants in the same location.

Questions?  Please contact Jon Stahler at jstahler@ala.org.

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