Digital Reference Section, Library of Congress, Offers Monthly Orientation to Web Site

Digital Reference Section, Library of Congress, Offers Monthly Orientation to Web Site

The Library of Congress is the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, with more than 134 million books, recordings, photographs and prints, maps, music items, and manuscripts.  Collected in more than 470 languages, the materials range from rare cuneiform tablets to born digital materials.  Through its Web site (www.loc.gov), the Library makes available its resources, services, and more than fifteen million of its items in American history and culture.

The Digital Reference Section (DRS) conducts a free one-hour orientation, monthly on the second Wednesday at 11 a.m. – noon, Eastern Time, via Web conference.  Throughout the program, DRS staff provide opportunities to ask questions, learn strategies for online access of the materials, and sample the collections and resources provided to facilitate your research.

The next session will be Wednesday, August 12, 11:00 am -12:00 pm, EDT.  To learn more and register for the Orientation, visit http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/orientation.html.  Confirmation will be sent via email.  For more information or to request an Orientation for a group, contact the Digital Reference Section via the Ask A Librarian form at http://www.loc.gov/rr/askalib/ask-digital.html.

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Digital Reference Section, Library of Congress, Offers Monthly Orientation to Web Site

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Hello Everyone,

This is an announcement for a monthly service that we offer.  We have spaces available for tomorrow’s session, so if you are interested, please register. The price is right (free).
Judith Graves

The Library of Congress is the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, with more than 134 million books, recordings, photographs and prints, maps, music items, and manuscripts.  Collected in more than 470 languages, the materials range from rare cuneiform tablets to born digital materials.  Through its Web site (www.loc.gov), the Library makes available its resources, services, and more than fifteen million of its items in American history and culture.

How can you access the wealth of information available on the Library’s Web site?  What resources and services can assist you? The Digital Reference Section (DRS) conducts a free, one-hour orientation monthly, on the second Wednesday at 11 a.m. – noon, Eastern time, via Web conference.  Throughout the program, DRS staff provide opportunities to ask questions, learn strategies for online access of the materials, and sample the collections and resources provided to facilitate your research.

The next session will be May 13, 11 a.m. – noon, Eastern time.  To register for the Orientation, use the Participant Registration Form, available from  http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/orientation_form.php. Confirmation, log on instructions, and the handout will be sent via email.  Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis.  For more information or to request the Orientation for a group, contact the Digital Reference Section via the Ask A Librarian form at http://www.loc.gov/rr/askalib/ask-digital.html.

Judith K. Graves
Digital Projects Coordinator
Digital Reference Section
Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave, SE
Washington, DC 20540-4604

Email:  jgrav [at] loc [dot] gov
(v)202/707-2562; [f]202/252-3116
Virtual Programs & Services: http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/
Library of Congress:  http://www.loc.gov/

Digital Reference Section, Library of Congress, Offers Monthly Orientation to Web Site

Digital Reference Section, Library of Congress, Offers Monthly Orientation to Web Site

The Library of Congress is the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, with more than 134 million books, recordings, photographs and prints, maps, music items, and manuscripts.  Collected in more than 470 languages, the materials range from rare cuneiform tablets to born digital materials.  Through its Web site (www.loc.gov), the Library makes available its resources, services, and more than eleven million of its items in American history and culture.

How can you access the wealth of information available on the Library’s Web site?  What resources and services can assist you? The Digital Reference Section (DRS) conducts a free, one-hour orientation monthly, on the second Wednesday at 11 a.m. – noon, Eastern time, via Web conference.  Throughout the program, DRS staff provide opportunities to ask questions, learn strategies for online access of the materials, and sample the collections and resources provided to facilitate your research.

The next session will be January 14, 11 a.m. – noon, Eastern time.  To register for the Orientation, use the Participant Registration Form, available from  http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/orientation_form.php. Confirmation, log on instructions, and the handout will be sent via email.  Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis.  For more information or to request the Orientation for a group, contact the Digital Reference Section via the Ask A Librarian form at http://www.loc.gov/rr/askalib/ask-digital.html.

Library of Congress online orientation

Digital Reference Section, Library of Congress, Offers Monthly Orientation to Web Site

The Library of Congress is the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, with more than 134 million books, recordings, photographs and prints, maps, music items, and manuscripts.  Collected in more than 470 languages, the materials range from rare cuneiform tablets to born digital materials.  Through its Web site (www.loc.gov), the Library makes available its resources, services, and more than eleven million of its items in American history and culture.

How can you access the wealth of information available on the Library’s Web site?  What resources and services can assist you?

The Digital Reference Section (DRS) conducts a free, one-hour orientation monthly, on the second Wednesday at 11 a.m. – noon, Eastern time, via Web conference.  Throughout the program, DRT staff provide opportunities to ask questions, learn strategies for online access of the materials, and sample the collections and resources provided to facilitate your research.

The next session will be September 10, 11 a.m. – noon, Eastern time. To learn more and register for the Orientation, visit http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/orientation.html.  Confirmation will be sent via email.  Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information or to request the Orientation for a group, contact the Digital Reference Section via the Ask A Librarian form at http://www.loc.gov/rr/askalib/ask-digital.html.

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Library of Congress Online Program: Declaring Independence: Beyond the 4th of July (Tomorrow, 7/9)

Declaring Independence: Beyond the Fourth of July

Everybody knows we celebrate the 4th of July because that’s the day we declared independence. But there’s more to the Declaration of Independence story than just one day or even just one document.  Join Library of Congress librarians who will show the Declaration of Independence as it evolved from an idea to an event, looking, with participants, at a variety of drafts and editions of the Declaration and related documents.

When:  Wednesday, July 9, 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time), 1:00-2:00 p.m. Central Time

NOTE:  Allow yourself time to download the small software plugin needed to participate in the conference.  Depending on your network security requirements, you may need assistance from your local technical support group to download and install the plugin.  Actual installation should be very quick, depending on your computer and connectivity.  All that is needed is a computer with an Internet connection, sound card, and speakers.  A microphone will enable you to speak to the group.

To attend, go to OPAL at http://www.opal-online.org/.  From the Quick Links column on the left, choose Auditorium.

1. Click the “Download Here” gray button in the light blue rectangle in the center of the screen.
2. Follow the directions to download and install the plugin.
3. Click the link in the orange rectangle to enter the room.
4. A gray box will appear with text asking permission to launch an external application, web conference plugin.  When the grayed out text “Launch application” becomes black, click the Launch application button.
5. Type your name (no password is required) and click “Log on” to enter the online conference.

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Online Orientation to Library of Congress Web site (7/9)

Digital Reference Section, Library of Congress Offers Monthly Orientation to Web Site

The Library of Congress is the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, with more than 134 million books, recordings, photographs and prints, maps, music items, and manuscripts.  Collected in more than 470 languages, the materials range from rare cuneiform tablets to born digital materials.  Through its Web site (www.loc.gov), the Library makes available its resources, services, and more than eleven million of its items in American history and culture.

How can you access the wealth of information available on the Library’s Web site?  What resources and services can assist you?

The Digital Reference Section (DRS) conducts a free, one-hour orientation monthly, on the second Wednesday at 11 a.m. – noon, Eastern time, via Web conference.  Throughout the program, DRT staff provide opportunities to ask questions, learn strategies for online access of the materials, and sample the collections and resources provided to facilitate your research.

The next session will be July 9, 11 a.m. – noon, Eastern time.  To learn more and register for the Orientation, visit http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/orientation.html.  Confirmation will be sent via email.  Each session is limited to fifteen people, on a first-come, first-served basis.  For more information or to request an Orientation for a group, contact the Digital Reference Team via the Ask A Librarian form at http://www.loc.gov/rr/askalib/ask-digital.html.

Library of Congress Web Conference: Invisible Ancestors: Ideas & Strategies for Recreating Their Stories

Invisible Ancestors:  Ideas & Strategies for Recreating Their Stories: A Web Conference
When:  Wednesday, June 18, 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. (Eastern Daylight Time), 1:00-2:00 p.m. Central Time

Many ancestors – early immigrants and pioneers, slaves, women, native peoples, and others – do not have compiled biographies.  They are invisible except in the historical record, through the census or other data collection entities.  Where there are gaps in their history, the stories can be told through early travelogues, letters, diaries, other texts and printed ephemera, photographs and other visual media, and maps.

Join Library of Congress Digital Projects Coordinator, Judy Graves, and Local History & Genealogy Specialist, Anne Toohey, for ideas and strategies for combining physical and online materials that go beyond the data and recreate the stories of these individuals.  We invite you to take this opportunity to sample the Library’s online materials and locate items that will enrich the stories of those whom you would like to know better.

NOTE:  Allow yourself time to download the small software plugin needed to participate in the conference.  Depending on your network security requirements, you may need assistance from your local technical support group to download and install the plugin.  Actual installation should be very quick, depending on your computer and connectivity.  All that is needed is a computer with an Internet connection, sound card, and speakers.  A microphone will enable you to speak to the group.

To attend, go to OPAL at http://www.opal-online.org/.  From the Quick Links column on the left, choose Auditorium.

1. Click the “Download Here” button in the light blue rectangle in the center of the screen.
2. Follow the directions to download and install the plugin.
3. Click the link in the orange rectangle to enter the room.
4. A gray box will appear with text asking permission to launch an external application, web conference plugin.  When the grayed out text “Launch application” becomes black, click the Launch application button.
5. Type your name (no password is required) and click “Log on” to enter the online conference.

To learn more about programs sponsored by the Digital Reference Section, see Virtual Programs & Services – http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/.

To learn more about the Library’s Local History & Genealogy Reading Room, see http://www.loc.gov/rr/genealogy/.

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