ALCTS webinar: Principles of Classification

Date: October 24, 2012
All webinars are one hour in length and begin at 11am Pacific, noon Mountain, 1pm Central, and 2pm Eastern time.

Description: Have you ever wondered why we have library classification systems and how they work? How does one system organize information compared to another?

This webinar will first cover basic, general principles of classification. It will also present the basic structure of the two main systems we use, Library of Congress Classification (LCC) and Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), and will discuss their strengths and weaknesses. It will illustrate some of the main differences between LCC and DDC with practical examples.

Audience: This webinar would be of interest to catalogers and non-catalogers who want a basic introduction to the classification systems and their structure.

Presenter:Lai Ma is a Ph.D. Candidate and Adjunct Lecturer at the School of Library and Information Science at Indiana University-Bloomington, where she also obtained a M.L.S. Lai has taught courses in the area of knowledge organization for more than four years. Her research interests include the interrelationship between information infrastructure and society.

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Registration Fees:  $39 ALCTS Member; $49 Non-member; $39 International; $99 Group (a group of people that will watch it together).

For additional information and access to registrations links, please go to the following website:
http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webinar/102412

ALCTS webinars are recorded and registrants receive a link to the recording shortly following the live event.

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling 1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration@ala.org. For all other questions or comments related to the webinars, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or alctsce@ala.org.

Posted on behalf of the ALCTS Continuing Education Committee.

ALCTS Selecting Digital Content to Preserve – part 1

ALCTS webinar: From the Digital Dark Ages to a Digital Renaissance: The Art of Selecting Digital Content to Preserve

Date: October 10, 2012

All webinars are one hour in length and begin at 11am Pacific, noon Mountain, 1pm Central, and 2pm Eastern time.

This webinar focuses on the basic first questions we all must answer in order to begin developing a digital preservation program: What digital content do we have, and what are we responsible for preserving? We begin by identifying all of the digital content that might be within our scope of responsibility. Then we explore strategies for appraisal, prioritization, and acquisition to refine the scope of selecting which digital content should be included in our preservation program.

This is the first session of a two part series titled “From the Digital Dark Ages to a Digital Renaissance.” Part 2, The Role of Long-Term Storage in Digital Curation, will be held November 14, 2012.

Learning Outcomes: This session covers key terms, standards, and concepts related to digital preservation and equips participants with planning strategies for developing a digital preservation plan/program.

Who Should Attend? Technical services librarians with beginning knowledge of digital preservation and an interest in or responsibility for the preservation/stewardship/management of digital content.

Presenters:

Brenda J. Miller is curator of the Hartford History Center at Hartford Public Library. The Hartford History Center is home to the Hartford Collection, a non-circulating, multi-media collection comprised of more than 50,000 books, trade publications, directories, postcards, photographs and memorabilia that convey community life in Hartford spanning nearly 300 years. Brenda holds a B.A. in History from the University of Connecticut and a M.A. in American Studies, Museums, Archives and Communities, from Trinity College, Hartford. Prior to serving as curator of the library’s special collections and archive, she coordinated the library’s very successful One Book for Greater Hartford, an annual regional literary program begun in 2002 to initiate community conversation around the reading of one book; and, Poetry Central, a poetry series that gave voice to classical and notable American poetry through dramatic readings and musical interpretation. She began her career as a journalist serving as editor for a Greater Hartford community newspaper group published under the Imprint banner.

Sarah Rhodes is the Digital Collections Librarian at the Georgetown University Law Library. She manages the Georgetown Law Center’s digital institutional repository, Web harvesting projects, a dataset repository in support of empirical legal scholarship, and the Chesapeake Group, a digital archive for the preservation of born-digital legal information, shared by the Georgetown, Harvard, Maryland State, and Virginia State Law Libraries. She has presented digital preservation webinars on behalf of the Legal Information Preservation Alliance and has given presentations, participated in panel discussions, and facilitated workshops for the American Association of Law Libraries, Computers in Libraries, Electronic Resources & Libraries, and the Canadian Association for Information Science

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Single Webinar Registration Fees:  $39 ALCTS Member; $49 Non-member; $39 International; $99 Group (a group of people that will watch it together).

Check the ALCTS Web site for discount pricing for the entire webinar series.

For additional information and access to registrations links, please go to the following website:

http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webinar/pres/101012

ALCTS webinars are recorded and registrants receive a link to the recording shortly following the live event.

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling 1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration@ala.org. For all other questions or comments related to the webinars, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or alctsce@ala.org.

Posted on behalf of the ALCTS Continuing Education Committee.

ALCTS Continuing Education

ALCTS Web Course: Fundamentals of Preservation
Session: October 22 – November 16, 2012

Four-week online course that introduces participants to the principles, policies and practices of preservation in libraries and archives. It is designed to inform all staff, across divisions and departments and at all levels of responsibility. Provides tools to begin extending the useful life of library collections.

Course components:

– Preservation as a formal library function, and how it reflects and supports the institutional mission
– The primary role of preventive care, including good storage conditions, emergency planning, and careful handling of collections
– The history and manufacture of physical formats and how this impacts on preservation options
– Standard methods of care and repair, as well as reformatting options
– Challenges in preserving digital content and what the implications are for the future of scholarship

This course is one-third of the Collection Management Elective course approved by the Library Support Staff Certification Program (LSSCP).

Registration Fees:  $109 ALCTS Member and  $129 Non-member

For additional details, registration, and contact information please see: http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webcourse/fpres/ol_templ

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling 1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration@ala.org.
For all other questions or comments related to the web courses, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or alctsce@ala.org.

Posted on behalf of the ALCTS Continuing Education Committee.

ALCTS webinar: Accidents Happen: Protecting & Saving Family Treasures

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ALCTS webinar: Accidents Happen: Protecting & Saving Family Treasures

Date: April 26, 2011 All webinars are one hour in length and begin at 2pm Eastern, 1pm Central, noon Mountain, and 11am Pacific Time.

Description: Accidents and disasters happen. When it does are you prepared? Are your family treasures stored safely in your home or elsewhere? How do you save your photos when they’ve been submerged in flood water? What do you do if your books smell mildewy? What if your basement floods or worse? Attend this session to learn answers to these questions and more.

Kraft will provide tips and tools for checking out possible hazards around the house, dealing with mold and salvaging keepsakes, documenting damage for insurance purposes, and keeping your family safe.

Learning Outcomes:

– Steps to take in preparing for and responding to a disaster
– Basic understanding of dealing with mold
– Simple techniques for salvaging keepsakes
– Awareness of available disaster assistance

Audience: Anyone interested in learning about disaster preparation and response. Strategies discussed during the presentation can be applied to home, library, or business.

Presenter: Nancy E Kraft, Head of Preservation at the University of Iowa Libraries, is responsible for directing the preservation and conservation of the library collections at the University of Iowa. In 2009 she received the Midwest Archives Conference Presidents’ Award for her extraordinary work following the historic levels of flooding that struck Iowa in the summer of 2008. Kraft has assisted in many disaster recoveries, large and small, including the Iowa Floods of 1993 and 2008, the University of Iowa Old Capitol fire, the water soaked State Historical Society of Iowa building, and a mold outbreak in the Law Library’s rare book room. Her passion is assisting the individual to preserve his/her keepsakes.

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Free. This is a complimentary webinar presented as part of the Preservation Week events. Watch for further announcements on additional complimentary webinars during Preservation Week.

To register, visit the GoToWebinar site:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/168682080

For all other questions or comments related to the webinars, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or jreese@ala.org.

ALCTS E-forum, April 12-13–Patron-Driven Acquisitions: Where do I start and how do I know when I’ve arrived?

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Patron-Driven Acquisitions: Where do I start and how do I know when I’ve arrived?

April 12-13, 2011

Hosted by Angela M. Carreño and Nancy Gibbs

Please join us for an e-forum discussion. It’s free and open to everyone!
Registration information is at the end of the message.

Each day, sessions begin and end at:

Pacific: 6am – 2pm
Mountain: 7am – 3pm
Central: 8am – 4pm
Eastern: 9am – 5pm

Description

The convergence of ebook availability, patron interest in e-books, new business models and the economic crisis has accelerated library adoption of Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA). This change has been facilitated by customized patron-driven acquisitions programs from some major library book distributors and aggregators. The adoption of PDA has also been facilitated by a shift in collection management philosophy away from “just-in-case” collecting to a “just-in-time” strategy for providing access to collections. How should libraries balance patron driven acquisitions with more strategic decisions to prepare their collection for the future?

Topics to be covered include:

*       Budgets and how to budget
*       Campus sharing of costs (specifically between separately administered libraries on a campus)
*       Profiles – are they different for different disciplines? Are certain LC classes totally excluded (art, music)? What happens to your approval plans?
*       Foreign or domestic plans
*       ILL PDA – in print or in e format
*       E Reserve PDA – will this meet the needs on a short term basis?
*       Reference Collection PDA – is this a possibility? Could it be a browsable, ever changing collection? If so what are the associated costs for collections budget and for staff time?
*       Dual formats and Bundled pricing – could there be deep discounted pricing for print accompanying e formats?
*       Vendors/providers – who is doing what? Do you go through vendors or direct to publishers, or both?
*       Implications for collections – does this mechanism skew the collection?
*       Marketing and promotion – if you promote it will you run through your budget even faster than thought? What happens if you don’t promote it?
*       Consortia applications – if you have rich consortia obligations for shared borrowing what happens when your collection is all electronic?
*       Mechanics – marc records, link resolvers, monitoring, statistics, pricing models, duplications, weeding; levels of use (single user, multiple user), purchase versus subscription

Nancy Gibbs is head of Acquisitions at Duke University Libraries, She has held previous positions at Penn State University Libraries, Auburn University, and at North Carolina State University Libraries. She is the past chair of the Acquisitions Section of ALCTS and the 2007 recipient of the ALCTS Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. In 2008, she taught an Acquisitions Practices course to students in the United Arab Emirates at Al-Ain University and continues to speak about acquisitions practices, electronic books, and electronic resources at local, national and international conferences. She serves on advisory boards for a number of library vendors and is a consultant in the field of acquisitions, publishing and vendor relationships.

Angela M. Carreño is the Head of Collection Development for the Division of Libraries at New York University. Angela has led, coordinated and supported the expansive growth of licensed electronic resources at NYU since 2000. She is the primary licensing officer for the Division of Libraries and assumes primary responsibility for consortial collection development commitments. She represents the Libraries on collaborative projects with other campus units and other libraries. Since 2007 she has intensified work on the NYU electronic book collection in close collaboration with NYU’s branch campus library in Abu Dhabi, a library with an e-preferred collection policy. Angela is a member of the Springer Library Advisory Board; the Oxford Library Advisory Group and the Brill Library Advisory Group.

*What is an e-forum?*

An ALCTS e-forum provides an opportunity for librarians to discuss matters of interest, led by a moderator, through the e-forum discussion list. The e-forum discussion list works like an email listserv: register your email address with the list, and then you will receive messages and communicate with other participants through an email discussion. Most e-forums last two to three days. Registration is necessary to participate, but it’s free. See a list of upcoming e-forums at: http://bit.ly/upcomingeforum.

*To register:*

Instructions for registration are available at: http://bit.ly/eforuminfo. Once you have registered for one e-forum, you do not need to register again, unless you choose to leave the email list. Participation is free and open to anyone.