Navigating New Acquisition Models for Multimedia Content

Navigating New Acquisition Models for Multimedia Content

How is your institution evaluating the expanding number of acquisition models currently available for multimedia content? Which models are the best fit for your organization? Join us for a free interactive webinar that examines the innovative ways that leading institutions are acquiring video and audio content and learn about the new models currently on offer. The discussion will compare and contrast patron-driven models versus evidence-based models to keep you abreast of the most current ways to build custom video collections. Come with your questions and ideas of how youd like to acquire content.

Presenter: Zack Dorsey, vice president, marketing and new market sales, Alexander Street Press – ACRL Choice webinar

Register Today

When: October 9, 2014
Time: 11:00 am Pacific | 12:00 pm Mountain | 1:00 pmCentral | 2:00 pm Eastern

Make Acquisition & Assessment Easy- webinar

Make Acquisition & Assessment Easy

Thursday, Sept 18
2:00 pm EDT
(11:00 am PDT)

Register

Join ProQuest® for a free, hour-long webinar to learn how tools from Intota, ProQuests transformational library services platform, can provide librarians with essential acquisition, management, and assessment tools to ensure your collections contain the right titles and resources.
Our panel will:
Discuss how Intota streamlines demand driven acquisition while assessing print and electronic collections for qualiy ROI.
Illustrate how using Intota Assessment can help you understand how and when your collection is being used.

ALCTS Web Course: Fundamentals of Acquisitions

ALCTS Web Course: Fundamentals of Acquisitions
Session 4: September 15 – October 24, 2014

This six-week online course is a basic primer for library acquisitions
concepts common to all library materials formats. It covers:

· Goals and methods of acquiring monographs and serials in all
formats;

· Theoretical foundations and workflows of basic acquisitions
functions;

· Financial management of library collections budgets;

· Relationships among acquisitions librarians, library booksellers,
subscription agents, and publishers.

This course provides a broad overview of the operations involved in
acquiring materials after the selection decision is made.

In FOA, we distinguish between collection development, which involves the
selection of materials for the library; and acquisitions, which orders,
receives, and pays for those materials. In many libraries, selecting and
acquiring materials may be done in the same department—in the smallest
libraries perhaps even by the same person. In larger libraries, selection
may be done by a collection development department and/or designated
subject specialists, while a separate department acquires the selected
materials. In essence, acquisitions is a business operation, bringing
materials into the library and licensing access to library collections and
resources.

Who Should Attend: As a fundamentals course, FOA is tailored for
librarians and paraprofessionals new to the acquisitions field; and
librarians and support staff from other library units and library school or
LSSC students who want to know more about acquisitions. Although FOA
focuses on the acquisition of monographs in various physical formats, it
covers key components of acquisition and licensing processes for all
library materials, in all formats, in all types of libraries.

This course is one-third of the Collection Management Elective course
approved by the Library Support Staff Certification Program (LSSCP).

Because success in acquisitions depends on ability to collaborate,
negotiate, and be flexible to work out win-win solutions with others, this
course includes collaborative and social elements.
Instructors

Betsy Redman, Acquisitions Serials Librarian, Arizona State University

Eleanor Cook, Assistant Director for Discovery & Technical Services
Academic Library Services, East Carolina University

Michelle Flinchbaugh, Acquisitions and Digital Scholarship Services
Librarian, UMBC Library

Donna Smith, Assistant Head of Technical Services, Northern Kentucky
University

Jennifer Arnold, Director, Library Services, Central Piedmont Community
College

Registration Fees: $109 ALCTS Member and $139 Non-member

For additional details, registration links, and contact information see:
http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webcourse/foa/ol_templ

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling
1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration@ala.org. For all other
questions or comments related to web courses, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS
Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or alctsce@ala.org.

*Posted on behalf of the ALCTS Continuing Education Committee.*

Fundamentals of Acquisitions – International Session

ALCTS Web Course: Fundamentals of Acquisitions – International Session

April 13 – May 23, 2014

This special international session is intended for people located outside
of the United States and North America. The instructor, Kate Kasimor is
based out of the United Arab Emirates, and will be able to bring an
international viewpoint to the course. The weekly moderated chat sessions
will take place at a more convenient time for our international
participants and provide a better opportunity to fully engage in the
course. Students
located within North America are encouraged to attend one of the regular
FOA sessions that are instructed by U.S. based faculty. Please contact
Julie Reese, jreese@ala.org in the ALCTS Office at if you have any
questions or concerns.

Course Description

This six-week online course is a basic primer for library acquisitions
concepts common to all library materials formats. It covers:

· Goals and methods of acquiring monographs and serials in all formats;

· Theoretical foundations and workflows of basic acquisitions functions;

· Financial management of library collections budgets;

· Relationships among acquisitions librarians, library booksellers,
subscription agents, and publishers.

This course provides a broad overview of the operations involved in
acquiring materials after the selection decision is made.

In FOA, we distinguish between collection development, which involves the
selection of materials for the library; and acquisitions, which orders,
receives, and pays for those materials. In many libraries, selecting and
acquiring materials may be done in the same department–in the smallest
libraries perhaps even by the same person. In larger libraries, selection
may be done by a collection development department and/or designated
subject specialists, while a separate department acquires the selected
materials. In essence, acquisitions is a business operation, bringing
materials into the library and licensing access to library collections and
resources.

Because success in acquisitions depends on ability to collaborate,
negotiate, and be flexible to work out win-win solutions with others, this
course includes collaborative and social elements.

Other topics from an international perspective might include ethics
differences, dealing with vendors located outside of our countries,
communication across time zones, shipping across borders, currency
exchanges, and different laws.

Who Should Attend

As a fundamentals course, FOA is tailored for librarians and
paraprofessionals new to the acquisitions field; and librarians and support
staff from other library units and library school or LSSC students who want
to know more about acquisitions. Although FOA focuses on the acquisition
of monographs in various physical formats, it covers key components of
acquisition and licensing processes for all library materials, in all
formats, in all types of libraries.

This course is one-third of the Collection Management Elective course
approved by the Library Support Staff Certification Program (LSSCP).

Because success in acquisitions depends on ability to collaborate,
negotiate, and be flexible to work out win-win solutions with others, this
course includes collaborative and social elements.

Instructor

Kate Kasimor, Higher Colleges Of Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Registration Fees

$109 ALCTS Member/$139 Non-member

Registration for this course is U.S. based and the registration fees are in
US dollars.

For additional details, registration links, and contact information see:

http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webcourse/foa/ol_templ

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling
1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration@ala.org. For all other
questions or comments related to web courses, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS
Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or alctsce@ala.org.

The Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) is a
division of the American Library Association (ALA).

Fundamentals of Acquisitions

ALCTS Web Course: Fundamentals of Acquisitions
Next session: November 18 – December 13, 2013

This four-week online course is a basic primer for library acquisitions
concepts common to all library materials formats. It covers:

· Goals and methods of acquiring monographs and serials in all
formats;

· Theoretical foundations and workflows of basic acquisitions
functions;

· Financial management of library collections budgets;

· Relationships among acquisitions librarians, library booksellers,
subscription agents, and publishers.

This course provides a broad overview of the operations involved in
acquiring materials after the selection decision is made.

In FOA, we distinguish between collection development, which involves the
selection of materials for the library; and acquisitions, which orders,
receives, and pays for those materials. In many libraries, selecting and
acquiring materials may be done in the same department—in the smallest
libraries perhaps even by the same person. In larger libraries, selection
may be done by a collection development department and/or designated
subject specialists, while a separate department acquires the selected
materials. In essence, acquisitions is a business operation, bringing
materials into the library and licensing access to library collections and
resources.

Who should attend: As a fundamentals course, FOA is tailored for
librarians and paraprofessionals new to the acquisitions field; and
librarians and support staff from other library units and library school or
LSSC students who want to know more about acquisitions. Although FOA
focuses on the acquisition of monographs in various physical formats, it
covers key components of acquisition and licensing processes for all
library materials, in all formats, in all types of libraries.

This course is one-third of the Collection Management Elective course
approved by the Library Support Staff Certification Program (LSSCP).

Registration Fees: $109 ALCTS Member and $139 Non-member

For additional details, registration links, and contact information see:
http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webcourse/foa/ol_templ

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling
1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration@ala.org. For all other
questions or comments related to web courses, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS
Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or alctsce@ala.org.

*Posted on behalf of the ALCTS Continuing Education Committee.*

Patron-Driven Acquisition: Turning Theory into Practice

New workshop!

Patron-Driven Acquisition: Turning Theory into Practice
2-part workshop with Ben Hunter

Wednesdays, October 16 & 23, 2013
2:00pm Eastern|1:00 Central
12:00 Mountain|11:00am Pacific

Register

After learning about several mechanisms delivering Patron-Driven Acquisition (PDA) for print and electronic resources, and basic workflow considerations for each method, you will see what PDA looks like in practice, from usage rates of books purchased through PDA programs, to budget issues and marketing considerations.

Ben Hunter is currently the Head of Cataloging and Collections at the University of Idaho Library, a position he has held since July 2009. His work includes overseeing daily operations and providing strategic direction for the library’s Cataloging, Acquisitions, E-Resources and Serials, and Digital Initiatives units and serving as head of the Northern Idaho Academic Libraries Bibliographic Standards Group

ALCTS E-forum, April 12-13–Patron-Driven Acquisitions: Where do I start and how do I know when I’ve arrived?

via LIBREF-L

Patron-Driven Acquisitions: Where do I start and how do I know when I’ve arrived?

April 12-13, 2011

Hosted by Angela M. Carreño and Nancy Gibbs

Please join us for an e-forum discussion. It’s free and open to everyone!
Registration information is at the end of the message.

Each day, sessions begin and end at:

Pacific: 6am – 2pm
Mountain: 7am – 3pm
Central: 8am – 4pm
Eastern: 9am – 5pm

Description

The convergence of ebook availability, patron interest in e-books, new business models and the economic crisis has accelerated library adoption of Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA). This change has been facilitated by customized patron-driven acquisitions programs from some major library book distributors and aggregators. The adoption of PDA has also been facilitated by a shift in collection management philosophy away from “just-in-case” collecting to a “just-in-time” strategy for providing access to collections. How should libraries balance patron driven acquisitions with more strategic decisions to prepare their collection for the future?

Topics to be covered include:

*       Budgets and how to budget
*       Campus sharing of costs (specifically between separately administered libraries on a campus)
*       Profiles – are they different for different disciplines? Are certain LC classes totally excluded (art, music)? What happens to your approval plans?
*       Foreign or domestic plans
*       ILL PDA – in print or in e format
*       E Reserve PDA – will this meet the needs on a short term basis?
*       Reference Collection PDA – is this a possibility? Could it be a browsable, ever changing collection? If so what are the associated costs for collections budget and for staff time?
*       Dual formats and Bundled pricing – could there be deep discounted pricing for print accompanying e formats?
*       Vendors/providers – who is doing what? Do you go through vendors or direct to publishers, or both?
*       Implications for collections – does this mechanism skew the collection?
*       Marketing and promotion – if you promote it will you run through your budget even faster than thought? What happens if you don’t promote it?
*       Consortia applications – if you have rich consortia obligations for shared borrowing what happens when your collection is all electronic?
*       Mechanics – marc records, link resolvers, monitoring, statistics, pricing models, duplications, weeding; levels of use (single user, multiple user), purchase versus subscription

Nancy Gibbs is head of Acquisitions at Duke University Libraries, She has held previous positions at Penn State University Libraries, Auburn University, and at North Carolina State University Libraries. She is the past chair of the Acquisitions Section of ALCTS and the 2007 recipient of the ALCTS Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. In 2008, she taught an Acquisitions Practices course to students in the United Arab Emirates at Al-Ain University and continues to speak about acquisitions practices, electronic books, and electronic resources at local, national and international conferences. She serves on advisory boards for a number of library vendors and is a consultant in the field of acquisitions, publishing and vendor relationships.

Angela M. Carreño is the Head of Collection Development for the Division of Libraries at New York University. Angela has led, coordinated and supported the expansive growth of licensed electronic resources at NYU since 2000. She is the primary licensing officer for the Division of Libraries and assumes primary responsibility for consortial collection development commitments. She represents the Libraries on collaborative projects with other campus units and other libraries. Since 2007 she has intensified work on the NYU electronic book collection in close collaboration with NYU’s branch campus library in Abu Dhabi, a library with an e-preferred collection policy. Angela is a member of the Springer Library Advisory Board; the Oxford Library Advisory Group and the Brill Library Advisory Group.

*What is an e-forum?*

An ALCTS e-forum provides an opportunity for librarians to discuss matters of interest, led by a moderator, through the e-forum discussion list. The e-forum discussion list works like an email listserv: register your email address with the list, and then you will receive messages and communicate with other participants through an email discussion. Most e-forums last two to three days. Registration is necessary to participate, but it’s free. See a list of upcoming e-forums at: http://bit.ly/upcomingeforum.

*To register:*

Instructions for registration are available at: http://bit.ly/eforuminfo. Once you have registered for one e-forum, you do not need to register again, unless you choose to leave the email list. Participation is free and open to anyone.