What You Need to Know About Grant Writing

What You Need to Know About Grant Writing
with Nancy Kalikow Maxwell

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

2:30pm Eastern | 1:30pm Central
12:30pm Mountain | 11:30am Pacific

90 minutes

Register

In this workshop, Nancy Kalikow Maxwell—a professional library grant writer, former library director, and editor of the classic ALA Book of Library Grant Money—will share techniques on identifying the best private givers, corporations, community foundations, and government agencies for your library project. Whether you are new to grants or a seasoned grant pro, you will learn library-specific strategies to identify funding opportunities and develop winning proposals and letters of inquiry.

Attend this workshop and you’ll be able to better:

  • find funding opportunities from private givers, corporations, community foundations and government agencies
  • identify the most common components for a successful grant
  • employ your research capacity to benefit from grants developed by other non-profit organizations

The Ramos Family Writer’s Workshop at Montgomery County Book Festival

Montgomery County Book Festival’s upcoming Writer’s Workshop:
Featuring NY Time Bestselling Authors C.C. Hunter & Dianna Love!
And Children’s Authors Marie Elena Cortes & Kimberly Morris
The Ramos Family Writer’s Workshop for Children, Teens, & Adults!
All proceeds benefit the Montgomery County Book Festival-a 501c3 organization.
Saturday, September 27, 2014
Lone Star College-Montgomery Campus
Building D-Theatre
3200 College Park Drive
Conroe, TX  77384
$20 online, $25 at the door
To Register Online or get more Information visit:

E-Books: What Librarians Need to Know Now and for the Future

E-Books: What Librarians Need to Know Now and for the Future

with Mirela Roncevic

4-week eCourse
Beginning Monday, October 13

Register

Requiring no prior knowledge of e-books, this eCourse will sketch in their history while showing you how they function in libraries, exploring issues ranging from file formats to delivery mechanisms and lending policies and what they mean for libraries both now and in the future.

After completing this eCourse, you’ll understand

  • basics of how e-books function and their place in the current publishing marketplace
  • how e-books are currently being used in libraries, including circulation and lending policies
  • key issues that librarians are likely to face with e-books in the future
  • e-book distribution models

Introduction to Cataloging

Introduction to Cataloging

Instructor: Melissa Adler
Dates: October 6-31, 2014
Credits: 1.5 CEUs
Price: $175

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/005-intro-cataloging.php

Are you a librarian who has suddenly been given the responsibility of cataloging for your library, but you know little to nothing about how to do it? Or do you feel that a quick course on cataloging will simply make you a better librarian? Or perhaps it has been a long time since you did cataloging work and you need a refresher. This four-week course will introduce the tools and techniques of the trade, including descriptive cataloging (RDA), subject cataloging (classification and subject headings), and an introduction to Machine Readable Cataloging (MARC). The course promises to provide practical, hands-on training for non-catalogers, including sample workflows, an introduction to copy cataloging, and guides to make the job of cataloging easier.

We will rely heavily on freely available resources so that you learn to use tools that you will be able to access after the course. Each week will include an introduction to the week’s content, a few readings, and an exercise or quiz. We will also have discussion forums for each week, and participation is considered essential. Expect to spend about 3.5 hours on coursework each week.

Melissa Adler is Assistant Professor at the University of Kentucky School of Library and Information Science, where she teaches courses in Information Organization and other areas of librarianship. She holds a PhD in Library and Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin Madison and has seven years of academic library experience, primarily in the realm of cataloging.

Course structure
This is an online class that is taught asynchronously, meaning that participants do the work on their own time as their schedules allow. The class does not meet together at any particular times, although the instructor may set up optional sychronous chat sessions. Instruction includes readings and assignments in one-week segments. Class participation is in an online forum environment.
Introduction to Cataloging

Instructor: Melissa Adler
Dates: October 6-31, 2014
Credits: 1.5 CEUs
Price: $175

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/005-intro-cataloging.php

Are you a librarian who has suddenly been given the responsibility of cataloging for your library, but you know little to nothing about how to do it? Or do you feel that a quick course on cataloging will simply make you a better librarian? Or perhaps it has been a long time since you did cataloging work and you need a refresher. This four-week course will introduce the tools and techniques of the trade, including descriptive cataloging (RDA), subject cataloging (classification and subject headings), and an introduction to Machine Readable Cataloging (MARC). The course promises to provide practical, hands-on training for non-catalogers, including sample workflows, an introduction to copy cataloging, and guides to make the job of cataloging easier.

We will rely heavily on freely available resources so that you learn to use tools that you will be able to access after the course. Each week will include an introduction to the week’s content, a few readings, and an exercise or quiz. We will also have discussion forums for each week, and participation is considered essential. Expect to spend about 3.5 hours on coursework each week.

Melissa Adler is Assistant Professor at the University of Kentucky School of Library and Information Science, where she teaches courses in Information Organization and other areas of librarianship. She holds a PhD in Library and Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin Madison and has seven years of academic library experience, primarily in the realm of cataloging.

Course structure
This is an online class that is taught asynchronously, meaning that participants do the work on their own time as their schedules allow. The class does not meet together at any particular times, although the instructor may set up optional sychronous chat sessions. Instruction includes readings and assignments in one-week segments. Class participation is in an online forum environment.

Payment info
You can register in this course through the first week of instruction. The “Register” button on the website goes to our credit card payment gateway, which may be used with personal or institutional credit cards. (Be sure to use the appropriate billing address). If your institution wants to pay using a purchase order, please contact us to make arrangements.

Library Juice Academy
P.O. Box 188784
Sacramento, CA 95818
Tel. 218-260-6115
Fax 916-415-5446

inquiries@libraryjuiceacademy.com
http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/

Testimonials:
http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/testimonials.php

Twitter:
http://twitter.com/libjuiceacademy

Check out our jingle:
http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/news/?p=139

Techniques for Student Engagement in Library Instruction

Techniques for Student Engagement in Library Instruction

Instructor: John Doherty
Dates: October 6-31, 2014
Credits: 1.5 CEUs
Price: $175

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/078-student-engagement.php

How do we engage students in their own learning, especially in short, one-shot library instruction sessions? In this four-week, online workshop we will examine a variety of student engagement techniques, focusing on Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning, problem solving, and metacognition. Over the course of four weeks we will examine up to 10 of these techniques and how they can be applied in traditional, blended, and online classes. We will especially uncover approaches that will work for one shot library sessions. In groups we will examine one or two student engagement techniques in detail, and explore how these might work in our own contexts. We will also develop a plan for applying a student engagement technique in our own practice. This will be a discussion intensive workshop in which it will be essential to follow a close schedule of information presentation, interaction, and assessment.

Dr. John J. Doherty is an instructional designer with the Northern Arizona University’s e-Learning Center. From 1993 to 2007 he worked in academic libraries, with an emphasis on library instruction and critical information literacy. He has published and presented nationally and internationally in these areas, including “Design to learn, learn to design: using backward design for information literacy instruction” (co-authored with Bruce E. Fox in Communications in Information Literacy, 5.2, 2011).

Course structure
This is an online class that is taught asynchronously, meaning that participants do the work on their own time as their schedules allow. The class does not meet together at any particular times, although the instructor may set up optional sychronous chat sessions. Instruction includes readings and assignments in one-week segments. Class participation is in an online forum environment.

Payment info
You can register in this course through the first week of instruction. The “Register” button on the website goes to our credit card payment gateway, which may be used with personal or institutional credit cards. (Be sure to use the appropriate billing address). If your institution wants to pay using a purchase order, please contact us to make arrangements.

Library Juice Academy
P.O. Box 188784
Sacramento, CA 95818
Tel. 218-260-6115
Fax 916-415-5446

inquiries@libraryjuiceacademy.com
http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/

Testimonials:
http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/testimonials.php

Twitter:
http://twitter.com/libjuiceacademy

Check out our jingle:
http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/news/?p=139

Cataloging for Non-Catalogers

Get the training you need to start cataloging!

Cataloging for Non-Catalogers

with Sylvia Hall-Ellis

12-week eCourse
Beginning Monday, September 22

Register

Go from beginner to advanced cataloger in this advanced eCourse, from the basic core concepts to building your own records with several weeks of hands-on exercises under Hall-Ellis’ guidance. Cover the latest trends, techniques, and instructions—including RDA: Resource Description and Access—to help you catalog materials.

In 12 weeks, you will:

  • Learn about different cataloging schemes and different types of records
  • Learn the core concepts that govern the field of cataloging with an emphasis on working in an online environment
  • Learn how bibliographic description works, including the basics of different cataloging standards and bibliographic formats
  • Gain a thorough understanding of how authority control and subject access work
  • Catalog materials in a variety of formats and subject areas
  • Use the Dewey Decimal Classification Scheme and the Library of Congress Classification Scheme

Sylvia Hall-Ellis, an expert cataloger and instructor at the SJSU iSchool, will guide this asynchronous eCourse.

Participants who complete this http://ala-publishing.informz.net/z/cjUucD9taT00MjY4Njc3JnA9MSZ1PTEwNTI0NjY5NTUmbGk9MjQ3ODk4OTM/index.html” target=”_blank”>Advanced eCourse will receive an SJSU iSchool/ALA Publishing Advanced Certificate of Completion.

Engaging Your Community Through Cultural Heritage Digital Libraries

Karen Calhoun and Aaron Brenner
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
2:30pm Eastern | 1:30pm Central
12:30pm Mountain | 11:30am Pacific
90 minutes
Karen Calhoun and Aaron Brenner will discuss the digital library as a platform for a two-way exchange of knowledge between your library and community. At cultural heritage’s core is community, and in this workshop, you’ll learn about a range of approaches for community engagement. Community focuses your mission, builds and enriches your collection, and ultimately defines your digital library’s value and decides its sustainability.
Topics include:
  • How to test your assumptions on your audience and its needs
  • How to crowd source your digital library
  • How to use web services, APIs, and the semantic web to improve discoverability
  • How to establish a sustainable funding base for the long term
  • How to collaborate with community partners
  • How to win attention on the social web